Adult Befriending Service, Orkney (Update)

Examples of Practice

The health and social care partners in Orkney recognise there is significant evidence to show that isolation can both cause and exacerbate poor health outcomes.  Reducing isolation is understood to prevent or at least delay such outcomes from arising and therefore prevent or at least delay the increased use of other more expensive services.  The Befriending Service therefore forms an integral part of Orkney’s overall approach to the improved health and well-being of older people.

The full Adult Befriending Service Example of Practice (Update) is available here. It is an update of the original Example of Practice published in 2013, which can be accessed here

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Aberdeenshire Signposting Project (Update)

Examples of Practice

The Aberdeenshire Signposting Project works by linking people to local organisations, services, clubs and societies in their community that address issues in a person’s life.  ASP has a specific focus on improving quality of life and promoting positive mental health, with a spin-off aim being to prevent the poor health and wellbeing that can otherwise result.  ASP was seeing clients time and time again whose problem was essentially one of loneliness and isolation but who wanted simple companionship rather than anything more complex.

The full Aberdeenshire Signposting Project Example of Practice (Update) is available here. It is an update of the original Example of Practice published in 2013, which can be accessed here

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Report on Men’s Sheds in Scotland

Resource

We know from our direct work with Partnerships across Scotland that there are many local examples of work undertaken which seeks to build the capacity of local communities to become equal partners in producing their own health and social outcomes. Our ‘Reshaping Care for Older People Change Fund – Progress Report’ (November 2013) is evidence […]

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Falkirk – Community Connections

Examples of Practice

As identified in the Standards of Care for Dementia in Scotland (2011), early intervention is recognised as important in helping the person with dementia and their carer come to terms with the illness and gain information and advice which will assist maintaining independence for as long as possible. These standards also assert that ‘People with dementia and their carers have the right to live as independently as possible with access to recreational, leisure and cultural life in their community have the right to help to attain and maintain maximum independence, physical, mental, social and vocational ability, and full inclusion and participation in all aspects of life.’

Bill and Margaret

Dementia causes a sense of isolation and ‘detachedness’ which can be distressing and frightening. Finding ways to stimulate interests which can be shared with others, increases the feeling of involvement, gives opportunities for positive interaction and general helps the person with dementia feel more safe and secure.

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