Palliative Care @ Home

Examples of Practice

The aim of the Care @ Home project is to provide emotional and psychosocial support to people over 65 affected by Cancer, Motor Neurone Disease, Multiple Sclerosis and Parkinson’s Disease, allowing clients to remain cared for at home.  The Project also provides support to the carer/family member affected by the illnesses.

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Developing Risk Prediction to Support Preventative and Anticipatory Care in Scotland – Enhancing SPARRA (Version 3)

Examples of Practice

Information Services Division (ISD) was keen to further develop the Scottish Patients at Risk of Readmission and Admission (SPARRA) tool to identify patients who may benefit from a more anticipatory approach to their care; planning for events or exacerbations to reduce the risk of emergency hospital admission.

SPARRA is a tool which predicts a patient’s risk of emergency admission; a patient with a SPARRA score of 50% has a one in two chance of being admitted to hospital in the following year.

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Scottish Partnership for Palliative Care (SPPC)

Examples of Practice

Palliative care is not just “terminal care” over a few weeks or days.   Palliative care approaches are relevant to people living with advance disease, regardless of length or clarity of prognosis.

Around 38 000 people with palliative care needs die in Scotland each year and a much larger number are living with advanced progressive disease.  Most are older people.  Around 30% of acute bed days are used by people in their last year of life, and over 50% of people will die in hospital, although most people express a preference to die at home.  How Scotland cares for those approaching the end of life is therefore an issue of major and universal significance for the Scottish population and has a major impact on how Scotland uses scarce healthcare resources.

Palliative care is an integral part of achieving the transformational change (and shift of resources) envisioned in Reshaping Care for Older People.  Regardless of the success of preventative strategies death and dying is inevitable.  And unless we get this part of the trajectory right we are likely to continue to commit huge health care resources to providing care in the acute sector for people whose preference would be for care elsewhere.

Good quality palliative and end of life care is fundamental to delivering the safe, effective and person-centred care described in the Dementia Strategy and the Healthcare Quality Strategy.

Research indicates that patients who have been identified and placed  on a palliative care register are more likely to have their needs/wishes met, for example they are more likely to die at home (75%) as opposed to those who are not on the register (22% die at home). Currently, most people on a register have a cancer diagnosis but palliative care is relevant to people with any advanced life threatening disease.  References: Murray S.A, Boyd K, Sheikh A, Thomas K, Higginson, IJ. Developing primary palliative care. BMJ. 2004; 329:1056.

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Using Sheltered Housing as a Local Hub – Integrated Care and Housing Support Services, Aberdeen City.

Examples of Practice

An integrated housing and social care plan across local authority, health, third and independent sector providers was implemented to promote service improvement and cost efficiencies whilst improving outcomes for individuals and their carers.   Specifically:

 

  • To provide services designed to promote independence and wellbeing through flexible and integrated onsite personal care and housing support teams within sheltered and very sheltered housing.
  • To address recruitment difficulties
  • To reduce in-house service costs, maximise capacity, reduce duplication and reduce travel time.
  • To reduce the number of admissions to hospital and facilitate a speedy return home following an illness/crisis.

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