Homecare Reablement

Examples of Practice

  • The reablement approach in homecare offers support and encouragement to individuals to empower them to help themselves and so increase their independence. It supports individuals ‘to do’ rather than ‘doing to’ or ‘doing for’.
  • Goal setting and review of outcomes achieved are central to the reablement ethos. This means that we work with individuals and their carers to establish what tasks they want to gain confidence in doing or relearn particular skills. By engaging with individuals around an agenda of what they can do and what they would like to do we can develop short term interventions which support them to achieve these goals. These are often around basic daily living skills such as dressing, meal preparation and mobility. It is not uncommon for an individual to have lost confidence around their ability to carry out certain tasks after spending time in hospital.
  • Our traditional home care approach has been to assess people around what they no longer can do and provide a service to meet these deficiencies.  As a result services are embedded into people’s lives, often for length periods of time.  While this is perfectly acceptable for a number of people who suffer from severe and complex conditions it has the potential to create a dependency for people who may have had the potential to relearn or regain skills. Reablement focuses on this potential and research suggests that many people who would have received a traditional service leading to risks of dependency can eventually become more confident and lead fulfilling lives when they regain lost skills.

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Wise Connections – Older Adults Primary Care Mental Health

Examples of Practice

Older adults are under-represented in Primary Care Mental Health. Potential barriers include the perception that common mental health problems are an inevitable part of growing old, social isolation preventing older people accessing psychological therapy services, older people’s views, behaviours and attitudes may get in the way of them receiving psychological therapy and health professionals may inadvertently prevent older people from accessing psychological therapy.

Whilst many older people enjoy an active and fulfilling life, many may develop physical and psychological problems. In long term physical conditions, psychological factors have an important role in helping or hindering people’s responses to the treatment of such conditions.

Failure to address psychological elements hinders rehabilitation, leads to unnecessarily poorer outcomes and overloads hospitals and health care systems.

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Care at Home Pharmacy Team

Examples of Practice

The increased number of older people living at home with one or more long term condition means there is increased risk of errors with medication. This has been identified as a risk for emergency admission to hospital. These older people are not a group who would routinely receive a review.   Post Hospital Discharge a ‘transition’ time for many older people was originally targeted with the service now being available for all Care at Home clients.

Additional support to vulnerable older people to manage their medications can avoid emergency admission to hospital.

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Reablement

Examples of Practice

Older people becoming dependent on Care at Home services and losing their independence after a change in circumstances, e.g. hospital admission or period of illness.

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Vitality Programme out with Leisure Settings

Examples of Practice

This programme provides the opportunity for Community Planning Partnership partners to work together to support older people and promote physical activity within a clear inequalities context.

Physical inactivity has been identified as the fourth leading risk factor for global mortality (6% of deaths globally). With the exponential growth in the older population, increasing physical activity and exercise in older people has been identified as a key target by the World Health Organisation (WHO) Active Ageing Framework (2002), to reduce the global burden of non-communicable disease.

Physical activity is beneficial for healthy ageing. There has been increased evidence that physical activity impacts on disease prevention and management, psychosocial benefits and complications of immobility. It also supports the maintenance of independence, improving the quality of life, and ‘successful ageing’ and can provide significant savings to health and social care services

These benefits can be achieved by healthy older people as well as the frail and very old.

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