Joint Equipment Store

Examples of Practice

Investment to make improvements in the community equipment store to ensure systems are in place to provide outcome focused assessment and the provision of an effective equipment service – This is recognised as the responsibility of all care groups and services as a means of complementing other service provision, interventions and supporting overall service delivery e.g. facilitating hospital discharge.  The Joint Equipment Store was working at full capacity to accommodate the increasing numbers of equipment requests and increasing costs as we strived to support more people in their own homes.

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Smithfield Court Rehabilitation Service, Aberdeen

Examples of Practice

To provide a service designed to promote recovery and a return to independent living for service users.  Rehabilitation for adults with physical, social, communication and/or sensory difficulties, and for some with reduced confidence following illness, accident or other crisis situation.  The objective is to provide an holistic range of social care, therapies and activities to enable service users to achieve and maintain their best possible function and to support their return to independent living.

The overall goal is to decrease dependence on health and social care support, increase community integration and improve the quality of life of individuals whilst also supporting their carers.  The client group is older people and adults recovering from illness, accident or acquired brain injuries.  During the development of the service a gap for rehabilitation for younger people was identified and the facilities were further developed to enable their discharge from a specialist unit to continue their rehabilitation in a home setting.

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Scottish Partnership for Palliative Care (SPPC)

Examples of Practice

Palliative care is not just “terminal care” over a few weeks or days.   Palliative care approaches are relevant to people living with advance disease, regardless of length or clarity of prognosis.

Around 38 000 people with palliative care needs die in Scotland each year and a much larger number are living with advanced progressive disease.  Most are older people.  Around 30% of acute bed days are used by people in their last year of life, and over 50% of people will die in hospital, although most people express a preference to die at home.  How Scotland cares for those approaching the end of life is therefore an issue of major and universal significance for the Scottish population and has a major impact on how Scotland uses scarce healthcare resources.

Palliative care is an integral part of achieving the transformational change (and shift of resources) envisioned in Reshaping Care for Older People.  Regardless of the success of preventative strategies death and dying is inevitable.  And unless we get this part of the trajectory right we are likely to continue to commit huge health care resources to providing care in the acute sector for people whose preference would be for care elsewhere.

Good quality palliative and end of life care is fundamental to delivering the safe, effective and person-centred care described in the Dementia Strategy and the Healthcare Quality Strategy.

Research indicates that patients who have been identified and placed  on a palliative care register are more likely to have their needs/wishes met, for example they are more likely to die at home (75%) as opposed to those who are not on the register (22% die at home). Currently, most people on a register have a cancer diagnosis but palliative care is relevant to people with any advanced life threatening disease.  References: Murray S.A, Boyd K, Sheikh A, Thomas K, Higginson, IJ. Developing primary palliative care. BMJ. 2004; 329:1056.

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Partnership working to improve equipment and adaptation services

Examples of Practice

Reviewing all the elements of the community equipment service (as provided by all relevant Orkney Partners), with the aim of producing viable recommendations for service improvement which will support effective service pathways.  The review covered all aspects of the service e.g. governance, finance arrangements, operational store service logistics, roles and responsibilities of Partners in the assessment and provision of equipment, minor adaptations and supporting training needs.

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